5 Ways Technology Can Help Seniors Stay Connected

Technology is evolving every day; advancements that once took years or decades today only require mere weeks or months to achieve in this fast-paced world.  Not only can these advancements help to expand the psycho/social experience of seniors but new inventions are being introduced to help improve access to emergency services, support, and in-home resources for the homebound senior.   For instance, a company called Orbita has unveiled a home health care tool to help connect seniors with valuable information regarding medication adherence, caregiver coordination, and other important issues that arise when an individual is being treated within the home setting. Currently interfacing with the Amazon Echo Alexa product, Orbita is in talks with Google, Apple, and Microsoft to have those platforms successfully integrated with the tool sometime in 2017. This tool, working in tandem with the smart home tool (such as Alexa), would allow an individual to ask a question, verbally, without having to type or search for anything manually.   The senior would be able to ask questions about medication management or changes in pain or exacerbated symptoms and be connected to a live visiting nurse to address their concerns directly, expertly, and, most importantly, in real time.   While this specific tool might be a long way off before becoming commonplace in every home, there are still plenty of ways to integrate technology into the lives of seniors to help improve their quality of life.  From medical alert systems to social networking, here are five simple ways technology can benefit the seniors in your life:   Face to Face: New video chatting apps from companies like...

What You Need to Get Through an Extended Power Outage

Living without power for a few hours or even a day can be an inconvenience but it certainly is manageable.  To be without power, however, for an extended period of time can be much more difficult to navigate and can be dangerous for certain populations, especially if they lack the proper supplies.   There are steps and measures you can take to be proactive in the face of losing power over the course of a few days or even a week.   First and foremost, if you or someone in your household relies on electrically powered medical equipment to survive, you should be in contact with your local fire department before the loss of any power to alert them to your needs and they will make sure they mark you down on their list for priority emergency power restoration.  Along the same vein, if you or someone in your household requires daily medications, it is a good idea to have at least a week’s worth of medication on hand in case of an extended power outage.  If the power is out for that long, there is most likely a good reason for it, whether it is a serious snowstorm or downed trees or powerlines, you may not be able to leave the home so be sure to have enough medication in supply in case you become unexpectedly homebound.   Over the years, things we always needed or relied on during power outages have been consolidated into one device, our cell phones.  You use it for internet, communication, weather reports, emergency alerts, a flashlight, and yes, even as a telephone!...

5 Important Things to Monitor in the Homes of Independent Seniors

First with Thanksgiving, then Christmas, and Chanukah now behind us, the New Year brings with it the hope of fresh opportunities and new beginnings.  No doubt this holiday season was filled with friends and family gathering, bringing people together to celebrate and enjoy each other.  However, some people may have noticed some changes in their parents that may leave them questioning if their loved one is safe living independently at home.   Parents, aunt, uncles, and other beloved seniors in your life have been self-sufficient for so long it may not occur to you that living alone without regular support could becoming increasingly challenging for these individuals.  Here are some basic indicators you should be on the lookout for when considering introducing or increasing the level of care or support your loved one receives at home:   Physical Fitness & Well Being: What kind of physical shape your loved one is in is a very good way to begin your review of the home environment.  How easy it is for the senior to move around and throughout the home? Is there a loss of strength or increased fatigue? This may indicate the need to introduce home care services.  How are their clothes fitting? Weight loss can be indicative of an underlying illness but it can also be a sign that the senior isn’t eating regularly and may be malnourished. This could be the result of ill-fitting dentures, tooth aches or gum infection, or, more importantly, this could be a sign that the senior is forgetting to eat or that meal preparation is becoming too much of a challenge. Behavior...

Navigating Grief A Workshop for Education and Support

All Care Grief Loss Services is hosting Navigating Grief  A Workshop for Education and Support This two week workshop is open to any adult mourner that would like to learn more about grief through the life cycle, complicated grief, trauma and some healthy approaches to coping with life after loss.  This workshop is experiential and supportive. Each participate will receive helpful readings, resources and be invited to participate in discussions/ activities as comfortable. Both sessions must be attended to participate. Arlington, MA * 1-2:30 pm Tuesday, 2/7 and Monday, 2/13 RSVP by...

New Year. New Opportunity! Become an All Care Hospice Volunteer

All Care Hospice is currently seeking caring, compassionate people to offer comfort and support to our patients and families. As part of the care team, volunteers serve a vital role in affecting the quality of our patients’ lives. All Care Hospice serves the North Shore, Merrimack Valley and Greater Boston. Opportunities are available close to home! Our Next Volunteer Training will be February 6, 13, 27, March 6, 13 & 20th Registration is required. For more information or to enroll in the training, please contact our Volunteer Coordinator, Maureen Burge at 781-244-1129 CLICK HERE FOR A PRINTABLE VOLUNTEER TRAINING...