Healthy Heart Series – Part VI: Developing Heart Healthy Eating Habits

February is Healthy Heart month and All Care is pleased to publish a blog series covering what you need to know about heart disease, how to reduce your risk, the different effects of heart disease in women, signs and symptoms of a heart attack, as well as how to incorporate healthy habits and recipes into your lifestyle to increase the health of your heart. Part VI: Developing Heart Healthy Eating Habits Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.   Heart-healthy eating is not just about cutting back, it’s about making the right choices. Most people need to add more fruits and veggies to their diet which not only help to prevent heart disease but also may prevent cancer and improve diabetes.   While deciding on meals, remember that you want to limit the amount of fats in your diet, saturated and trans-fat should be limited and avoided. Try to keep saturated fat to no more than 10% of your daily calories and try to keep trans-fat out of your diet all together.   Major sources of saturated fat: Red Meat Dairy products Coconut & palm oil   Sources of trans-fat include: Deep-fried fast foods Bakery products Packaged snack foods Margarines Crackers   Hint: If the nutritional information includes the term “partially hydrogenate,” it means the product contains trans-fat   Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains help to protect your heart; beans,...

Healthy Heart Series – Part V: Women & Heart Disease

February is Healthy Heart Month and All Care is pleased to publish a blog series covering what you need to know about heart disease, how to reduce your risk, the different effects of heart disease in women, signs and symptoms of a heart attack, as well as how to incorporate healthy habits and recipes into your lifestyle to increase the health of your heart.   Part V: Women & Heart Disease Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.   What’s Different for Women & Heart Disease? Heart disease kills more women every year than all forms of cancer combined however only 56% of women know that heart disease is their most common cause of death. For white and African-American women, heart disease will be their leading killer while heart disease and cancer will claim equal lives from Latina women. Almost two thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease had no previous symptoms-meaning even if you have no signs or symptoms of heart disease you may still wind up a victim of this mass killer. After all, 90% of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease.   Heart disease and heart attacks often manifest themselves differently in men than women, mostly because there is a difference in plaque and blockage pattern in men and women. Dr. C. Noel Bairy Merz, a cardiologist who is...

Healthy Heart Series – Part IV: Signs & Symptoms of Heart Failure & Heart Attacks

February is Healthy Heart month and All Care is pleased to publish a blog series about heart disease, its effects, warning signs, and how to incorporate healthy habits to increase the health of your heart. Part IV: Signs & Symptoms of Heart Failure & Heart Attacks Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.   About 610,000 Americans dies from heart disease each year, roughly translating to 1 in every 4 deaths. Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease claiming more than 370,000 American lives, annually. Every minute in the United States someone dies from a heart-related event, and a lot of those deaths are preventable. Early diagnosis and treatment of heart disease and heart failure can help to improve the quality of an individual’s life while also extending their life, as well. There are various forms of treatment, medication, adopting a low-sodium diet, increasing physical activity, etc., but it’s still important that people with heart failure track their symptoms each day so they can review them with their physician but also to help them monitor their condition so that if there is a disruption in symptom pattern, appropriate and immediate action can be taken.   As we have covered extensively in the previous installments of our Healthy Heart Blog Series, there are many risk factors that contribute to heart disease and failure; while not all risk...

Healthy Heart Series – Part III: Easy Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease & Stroke

February is Healthy Heart month and All Care is pleased to publish a blog series about heart disease, its effects, warning signs, and how to incorporate healthy habits to increase the health of your heart. Part III: Easy Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease & Stroke Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.   Between 1950 and 2000, the death rate from stoke dropped nearly 80% while the death rate from heart disease dropped almost 70%; while Americans are dying of stroke and heart disease much less often, they are still being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease just as much as ever. Interestingly enough, some risk factors such as obesity and diabetes are even more prevalent today than they were 50 years ago!   What kind of sense does that make? Well, lots! Through research, awareness, education, and other advancements in the healthcare industry, people are living longer and healthier lives while dealing with chronic illness and disease. These advances in technology and pharmacology are wonderful for extending the quantity of life, but does your idea of quality of life involve being brought back from death’s door by a bypass surgery? Or include needing a specialized decoder pin to manage your medication? Probably not! Instead of benefitting from the vast medical strides the healthcare industry has made in recent years after a cardiac crisis, why not be proactive rather...

Healthy Heart Series – Part II: Reducing Your Risk of Heart Disease

February is Healthy Heart month and All Care is pleased to publish a blog series about heart disease, its effects, warning signs, and how to incorporate healthy habits to increase the health of your heart.   Part II: Reducing Your Risk of Heart Disease Heart disease is an umbrella term for any type of disorder that affects the heart. Heart disease means the same as cardiac disease but not cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease refers to disorders of the blood vessels and heart, while heart disease refers to just the heart.   While certain risk factors of heart disease are completely out of one’s control (family history, age, and gender, for example), other risk factors such as weight, cholesterol level, stress, diabetes, and high blood pressure can all be addressed to help the prevention of heart disease. There are many different risk factors for heart disease, some which are avoidable while others are genetic; for example, a woman can’t change her gender to alter her risk for heart disease but she can take the necessary steps to keep her heart healthy. Before you can take the necessary steps to reduce your risk of heart disease, it’s important to first understand what some of those risks are.   Risk Factors – and How You Can Reduce Them   In this blog we will explore 7 Common Heart Disease Risk Factors and How to Reduce Them while also exploring simple steps to take to insure the reduction of added risk in your lifestyle. 7 Major Risk Factors of Heart Disease & How to Reduce Them Smoking–Don’t Do It. Did you know smokers...